Having A Child Recognize Monetary Value

June 17th, 2014 by

It’s no surprise here that there is currently a teacher’s strike were as a result every child is out of school. As a result, today I spent some time with my nephew as a form of “babysitting.” Funny enough, I find that I have an easier time communicating and getting him to listen as opposed to say my parents trying to do the same. People might think this sounds weird, but talking about finances and relating it to his everyday life seems to make him more disciplined.

It was awhile back for example where I taught him how buying a beverage at the supermarket is so much cheaper than at a restaurant. As a result, whenever he gets the urge to want something now in a child-like fashion, asking him how much the item costs or if he could think of a way to get more for less makes him think and behave. This worked surprisingly well for even other stuff I noticed today such as if he saw a toy that he immediately wanted. Asking him how much money he had or knowing that people have to spend money to get them those items pretty much stops the whining.

That just makes me reflect back on my own childhood experiences and how recognizing the monetary value of items was a good way to get me to be sensitive and understanding to prevent myself from recklessly wasting money or expecting everyone to give me things. Of course this doesn’t mean you should dump the child into an intense lesson about accounting as even I wouldn’t have had the attention span for that.

I’m not a child psychologist or anything, but it sure makes you think where like in some cases if a child is always yelling and screaming about not getting a toy a lot of adults would resort to something aggressive to get them under control. From my experience, maybe a little financial education is all they need which will help in more ways than one.


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